MOREL MUSHROOM

Morel, Morililes, Morchella Conica, Morelles, Kuzugöbeği Mantarı

Morel mushrooms belong to the same species as the truffle, but their appearance is quite different. Morel mushrooms range from tan to dark brown, they’re elongated, 2 to 4 inches long and have a cone-shaped cap covered in a honeycomb texture. Wild morels grow from April through June, depending on the region. You may find dried morel mushrooms in specialty stores throughout the year.

Vitamin D

The primary source of vitamin D is sunlight because exposure to ultraviolet light triggers a vitamin D-producing process in your skin. Vitamin D is not found in many foods, especially not in plant-based foods, but it is present in mushrooms. Morels are one of the highest mushroom sources, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You must have an adequate amount of vitamin D for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Vitamin D also helps regulate blood pressure and stimulates messenger cells in the immune system. One cup of raw morel mushrooms provides 22 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Iron

In addition to carrying oxygen, iron stores oxygen and senses when its levels are low. Several enzymes depend on iron to complete their biochemical processes. Iron is needed for some antioxidants, the production of genetic material essential for growth and healing and the creation of energy. Men gain 100 percent of their recommended daily intake for iron from 1 cup of raw morel mushrooms, while women get 44 percent of their daily value.

B Vitamins

The B vitamins function as coenzymes, which means they activate enzymes that trigger biochemical reactions. One of the most important processes that rely on the presence of B vitamins is the conversion of food into energy. Two of the B vitamins -- niacin and vitamin B-6 -- may contribute to heart health. Vitamin B-6 removes a substance from the blood that’s associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Niacin lowers levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One cup of morel mushrooms provides 8 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin B-6 and niacin and 11 percent of riboflavin.

Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is associated with numerous conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes types 1 and 2. Consuming antioxidant-rich food, therefore, is an important strategy to protect against this internal damage. Studies have shown that extracts from morel mycelium are effective in combating oxidation. This is primarily accomplished through the scavenging of damaging molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals (4). Antioxidants from morel mushrooms have also been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation – a process involving tissue damage which, if left unchecked, can lead to inflammation and cancer (5).

Liver Protection

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an inorganic compound which has been linked to disorders of the central nervous system and kidneys. Research on animals has shown that administration of CCl4 with ethanol damages the liver by, among other things, depleting internal antioxidant stores. When supplied with an extract of morel mycelium, however, protection is provided against liver damage, and antioxidant reserves can be restored. This suggests that morel mushroom mycelium may provide therapeutic use as a liver-protecting agent (6).

Low Calorie Content

A 1-cup serving of morel mushrooms, which weighs 68 grams, has just 20 calories. With 0.3 calories per gram, these mushrooms are considered a very low-energy-dense food. That means the mushrooms are very low in calories compared to their weight, so you get to eat a larger portion of them without consuming an excessive number of calories. Including more low-energy-dense foods in your diet can help control hunger when trying to eat fewer calories.

Carbs and Fiber

The morel mushrooms are low in carbs but a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving contains 3 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber. Fiber helps move food through your digestive system. Additionally, getting more fiber in your diet lowers blood cholesterol levels, prevents constipation and helps you feel full faster. Your daily fiber needs vary depending on your age and gender. In general, women need 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day and men 30 to 38 grams.

Some Protein, Negligible Fat

The morel mushrooms also supply a small amount of protein and even a smaller amount of fat. A 1-cup serving contains 2 grams of protein and 0.4 grams of fat. Both protein and fat are essential nutrients you need for good health. Protein repairs tissue and supports immune health, while fat provides energy and helps you absorb fat-soluble vitamins. A healthy diet should get 10 percent to 35 percent of its calories from protein and 20 percent to 35 percent from fat.

Vitamins and Minerals

While morel mushrooms are very low in calories, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium and vitamin D. A 1-cup serving of raw morel mushrooms contains 8 milligrams of iron, 271 milligrams of potassium and 136 international units of vitamin D. Iron carries the oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Potassium is necessary for proper functioning of your muscles and nervous system. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and supports bone health.

Morel Crostini

Morel Mushroom Recipes

Ingredients

4 slices baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh morels, cleaned
1 teaspoon minced shallot
2 tablespoons cream sherry
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup shelled, peeled fava beans
1/8 cup thinly sliced ramp leaves or chives
1 slice cooked bacon, crumbled
Shaved aged Sonoma Jack or Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. Brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake, turning once, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Remove from oven and set aside.
3. Melt butter in a medium skillet over high heat; cook until butter is lightly browned. Add morels and shallot and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Add sherry to deglaze and cook until almost evaporated. Add cream and let cook until reduced and thickened slightly. Stir in fava beans and ramp leaves or chives.
5. Divide morel mixture evenly among toasted baguette slices; top with crumbled bacon and garnish with cheese. Serve.

BOLETUS MUSHROOM

Boletes Mushroom, Cèpes, Boletus Edulis, Ayı Mantarı

Morel mushrooms belong to the same species as the truffle, but their appearance is quite different. Morel mushrooms range from tan to dark brown, they’re elongated, 2 to 4 inches long and have a cone-shaped cap covered in a honeycomb texture. Wild morels grow from April through June, depending on the region. You may find dried morel mushrooms in specialty stores throughout the year.

Vitamin D

The primary source of vitamin D is sunlight because exposure to ultraviolet light triggers a vitamin D-producing process in your skin. Vitamin D is not found in many foods, especially not in plant-based foods, but it is present in mushrooms. Morels are one of the highest mushroom sources, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You must have an adequate amount of vitamin D for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Vitamin D also helps regulate blood pressure and stimulates messenger cells in the immune system. One cup of raw morel mushrooms provides 22 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Iron

In addition to carrying oxygen, iron stores oxygen and senses when its levels are low. Several enzymes depend on iron to complete their biochemical processes. Iron is needed for some antioxidants, the production of genetic material essential for growth and healing and the creation of energy. Men gain 100 percent of their recommended daily intake for iron from 1 cup of raw morel mushrooms, while women get 44 percent of their daily value.

B Vitamins

The B vitamins function as coenzymes, which means they activate enzymes that trigger biochemical reactions. One of the most important processes that rely on the presence of B vitamins is the conversion of food into energy. Two of the B vitamins -- niacin and vitamin B-6 -- may contribute to heart health. Vitamin B-6 removes a substance from the blood that’s associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Niacin lowers levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One cup of morel mushrooms provides 8 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin B-6 and niacin and 11 percent of riboflavin.

Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is associated with numerous conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes types 1 and 2. Consuming antioxidant-rich food, therefore, is an important strategy to protect against this internal damage. Studies have shown that extracts from morel mycelium are effective in combating oxidation. This is primarily accomplished through the scavenging of damaging molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals (4). Antioxidants from morel mushrooms have also been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation – a process involving tissue damage which, if left unchecked, can lead to inflammation and cancer (5).

Liver Protection

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an inorganic compound which has been linked to disorders of the central nervous system and kidneys. Research on animals has shown that administration of CCl4 with ethanol damages the liver by, among other things, depleting internal antioxidant stores. When supplied with an extract of morel mycelium, however, protection is provided against liver damage, and antioxidant reserves can be restored. This suggests that morel mushroom mycelium may provide therapeutic use as a liver-protecting agent (6).

Low Calorie Content

A 1-cup serving of morel mushrooms, which weighs 68 grams, has just 20 calories. With 0.3 calories per gram, these mushrooms are considered a very low-energy-dense food. That means the mushrooms are very low in calories compared to their weight, so you get to eat a larger portion of them without consuming an excessive number of calories. Including more low-energy-dense foods in your diet can help control hunger when trying to eat fewer calories.

Carbs and Fiber

The morel mushrooms are low in carbs but a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving contains 3 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber. Fiber helps move food through your digestive system. Additionally, getting more fiber in your diet lowers blood cholesterol levels, prevents constipation and helps you feel full faster. Your daily fiber needs vary depending on your age and gender. In general, women need 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day and men 30 to 38 grams.

Some Protein, Negligible Fat

The morel mushrooms also supply a small amount of protein and even a smaller amount of fat. A 1-cup serving contains 2 grams of protein and 0.4 grams of fat. Both protein and fat are essential nutrients you need for good health. Protein repairs tissue and supports immune health, while fat provides energy and helps you absorb fat-soluble vitamins. A healthy diet should get 10 percent to 35 percent of its calories from protein and 20 percent to 35 percent from fat.

Vitamins and Minerals

While morel mushrooms are very low in calories, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium and vitamin D. A 1-cup serving of raw morel mushrooms contains 8 milligrams of iron, 271 milligrams of potassium and 136 international units of vitamin D. Iron carries the oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Potassium is necessary for proper functioning of your muscles and nervous system. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and supports bone health.

Morel Crostini

Morel Mushroom Recipes

Ingredients

4 slices baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh morels, cleaned
1 teaspoon minced shallot
2 tablespoons cream sherry
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup shelled, peeled fava beans
1/8 cup thinly sliced ramp leaves or chives
1 slice cooked bacon, crumbled
Shaved aged Sonoma Jack or Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. Brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake, turning once, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Remove from oven and set aside.
3. Melt butter in a medium skillet over high heat; cook until butter is lightly browned. Add morels and shallot and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Add sherry to deglaze and cook until almost evaporated. Add cream and let cook until reduced and thickened slightly. Stir in fava beans and ramp leaves or chives.
5. Divide morel mixture evenly among toasted baguette slices; top with crumbled bacon and garnish with cheese. Serve.

CHANTERELLES MUSHROOM

Chantrelles, Girolles, Cantharellus, Cibarius, Sarıkız Mantarı

Morel mushrooms belong to the same species as the truffle, but their appearance is quite different. Morel mushrooms range from tan to dark brown, they’re elongated, 2 to 4 inches long and have a cone-shaped cap covered in a honeycomb texture. Wild morels grow from April through June, depending on the region. You may find dried morel mushrooms in specialty stores throughout the year.

Vitamin D

The primary source of vitamin D is sunlight because exposure to ultraviolet light triggers a vitamin D-producing process in your skin. Vitamin D is not found in many foods, especially not in plant-based foods, but it is present in mushrooms. Morels are one of the highest mushroom sources, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You must have an adequate amount of vitamin D for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Vitamin D also helps regulate blood pressure and stimulates messenger cells in the immune system. One cup of raw morel mushrooms provides 22 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Iron

In addition to carrying oxygen, iron stores oxygen and senses when its levels are low. Several enzymes depend on iron to complete their biochemical processes. Iron is needed for some antioxidants, the production of genetic material essential for growth and healing and the creation of energy. Men gain 100 percent of their recommended daily intake for iron from 1 cup of raw morel mushrooms, while women get 44 percent of their daily value.

B Vitamins

The B vitamins function as coenzymes, which means they activate enzymes that trigger biochemical reactions. One of the most important processes that rely on the presence of B vitamins is the conversion of food into energy. Two of the B vitamins -- niacin and vitamin B-6 -- may contribute to heart health. Vitamin B-6 removes a substance from the blood that’s associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Niacin lowers levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One cup of morel mushrooms provides 8 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin B-6 and niacin and 11 percent of riboflavin.

Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is associated with numerous conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes types 1 and 2. Consuming antioxidant-rich food, therefore, is an important strategy to protect against this internal damage. Studies have shown that extracts from morel mycelium are effective in combating oxidation. This is primarily accomplished through the scavenging of damaging molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals (4). Antioxidants from morel mushrooms have also been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation – a process involving tissue damage which, if left unchecked, can lead to inflammation and cancer (5).

Liver Protection

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an inorganic compound which has been linked to disorders of the central nervous system and kidneys. Research on animals has shown that administration of CCl4 with ethanol damages the liver by, among other things, depleting internal antioxidant stores. When supplied with an extract of morel mycelium, however, protection is provided against liver damage, and antioxidant reserves can be restored. This suggests that morel mushroom mycelium may provide therapeutic use as a liver-protecting agent (6).

Low Calorie Content

A 1-cup serving of morel mushrooms, which weighs 68 grams, has just 20 calories. With 0.3 calories per gram, these mushrooms are considered a very low-energy-dense food. That means the mushrooms are very low in calories compared to their weight, so you get to eat a larger portion of them without consuming an excessive number of calories. Including more low-energy-dense foods in your diet can help control hunger when trying to eat fewer calories.

Carbs and Fiber

The morel mushrooms are low in carbs but a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving contains 3 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber. Fiber helps move food through your digestive system. Additionally, getting more fiber in your diet lowers blood cholesterol levels, prevents constipation and helps you feel full faster. Your daily fiber needs vary depending on your age and gender. In general, women need 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day and men 30 to 38 grams.

Some Protein, Negligible Fat

The morel mushrooms also supply a small amount of protein and even a smaller amount of fat. A 1-cup serving contains 2 grams of protein and 0.4 grams of fat. Both protein and fat are essential nutrients you need for good health. Protein repairs tissue and supports immune health, while fat provides energy and helps you absorb fat-soluble vitamins. A healthy diet should get 10 percent to 35 percent of its calories from protein and 20 percent to 35 percent from fat.

Vitamins and Minerals

While morel mushrooms are very low in calories, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium and vitamin D. A 1-cup serving of raw morel mushrooms contains 8 milligrams of iron, 271 milligrams of potassium and 136 international units of vitamin D. Iron carries the oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Potassium is necessary for proper functioning of your muscles and nervous system. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and supports bone health.

Morel Crostini

Morel Mushroom Recipes

Ingredients

4 slices baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh morels, cleaned
1 teaspoon minced shallot
2 tablespoons cream sherry
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup shelled, peeled fava beans
1/8 cup thinly sliced ramp leaves or chives
1 slice cooked bacon, crumbled
Shaved aged Sonoma Jack or Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. Brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake, turning once, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Remove from oven and set aside.
3. Melt butter in a medium skillet over high heat; cook until butter is lightly browned. Add morels and shallot and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Add sherry to deglaze and cook until almost evaporated. Add cream and let cook until reduced and thickened slightly. Stir in fava beans and ramp leaves or chives.
5. Divide morel mixture evenly among toasted baguette slices; top with crumbled bacon and garnish with cheese. Serve.

BLACK TRUMPET

Chantrelles, Girolles, Cantharellus, Cibarius, Sarıkız Mantarı

Morel mushrooms belong to the same species as the truffle, but their appearance is quite different. Morel mushrooms range from tan to dark brown, they’re elongated, 2 to 4 inches long and have a cone-shaped cap covered in a honeycomb texture. Wild morels grow from April through June, depending on the region. You may find dried morel mushrooms in specialty stores throughout the year.

Vitamin D

The primary source of vitamin D is sunlight because exposure to ultraviolet light triggers a vitamin D-producing process in your skin. Vitamin D is not found in many foods, especially not in plant-based foods, but it is present in mushrooms. Morels are one of the highest mushroom sources, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You must have an adequate amount of vitamin D for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Vitamin D also helps regulate blood pressure and stimulates messenger cells in the immune system. One cup of raw morel mushrooms provides 22 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Iron

In addition to carrying oxygen, iron stores oxygen and senses when its levels are low. Several enzymes depend on iron to complete their biochemical processes. Iron is needed for some antioxidants, the production of genetic material essential for growth and healing and the creation of energy. Men gain 100 percent of their recommended daily intake for iron from 1 cup of raw morel mushrooms, while women get 44 percent of their daily value.

B Vitamins

The B vitamins function as coenzymes, which means they activate enzymes that trigger biochemical reactions. One of the most important processes that rely on the presence of B vitamins is the conversion of food into energy. Two of the B vitamins -- niacin and vitamin B-6 -- may contribute to heart health. Vitamin B-6 removes a substance from the blood that’s associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Niacin lowers levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One cup of morel mushrooms provides 8 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin B-6 and niacin and 11 percent of riboflavin.

Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is associated with numerous conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes types 1 and 2. Consuming antioxidant-rich food, therefore, is an important strategy to protect against this internal damage. Studies have shown that extracts from morel mycelium are effective in combating oxidation. This is primarily accomplished through the scavenging of damaging molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals (4). Antioxidants from morel mushrooms have also been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation – a process involving tissue damage which, if left unchecked, can lead to inflammation and cancer (5).

Liver Protection

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an inorganic compound which has been linked to disorders of the central nervous system and kidneys. Research on animals has shown that administration of CCl4 with ethanol damages the liver by, among other things, depleting internal antioxidant stores. When supplied with an extract of morel mycelium, however, protection is provided against liver damage, and antioxidant reserves can be restored. This suggests that morel mushroom mycelium may provide therapeutic use as a liver-protecting agent (6).

Low Calorie Content

A 1-cup serving of morel mushrooms, which weighs 68 grams, has just 20 calories. With 0.3 calories per gram, these mushrooms are considered a very low-energy-dense food. That means the mushrooms are very low in calories compared to their weight, so you get to eat a larger portion of them without consuming an excessive number of calories. Including more low-energy-dense foods in your diet can help control hunger when trying to eat fewer calories.

Carbs and Fiber

The morel mushrooms are low in carbs but a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving contains 3 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber. Fiber helps move food through your digestive system. Additionally, getting more fiber in your diet lowers blood cholesterol levels, prevents constipation and helps you feel full faster. Your daily fiber needs vary depending on your age and gender. In general, women need 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day and men 30 to 38 grams.

Some Protein, Negligible Fat

The morel mushrooms also supply a small amount of protein and even a smaller amount of fat. A 1-cup serving contains 2 grams of protein and 0.4 grams of fat. Both protein and fat are essential nutrients you need for good health. Protein repairs tissue and supports immune health, while fat provides energy and helps you absorb fat-soluble vitamins. A healthy diet should get 10 percent to 35 percent of its calories from protein and 20 percent to 35 percent from fat.

Vitamins and Minerals

While morel mushrooms are very low in calories, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium and vitamin D. A 1-cup serving of raw morel mushrooms contains 8 milligrams of iron, 271 milligrams of potassium and 136 international units of vitamin D. Iron carries the oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Potassium is necessary for proper functioning of your muscles and nervous system. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and supports bone health.

Morel Crostini

Morel Mushroom Recipes

Ingredients

4 slices baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh morels, cleaned
1 teaspoon minced shallot
2 tablespoons cream sherry
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup shelled, peeled fava beans
1/8 cup thinly sliced ramp leaves or chives
1 slice cooked bacon, crumbled
Shaved aged Sonoma Jack or Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. Brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake, turning once, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Remove from oven and set aside.
3. Melt butter in a medium skillet over high heat; cook until butter is lightly browned. Add morels and shallot and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Add sherry to deglaze and cook until almost evaporated. Add cream and let cook until reduced and thickened slightly. Stir in fava beans and ramp leaves or chives.
5. Divide morel mixture evenly among toasted baguette slices; top with crumbled bacon and garnish with cheese. Serve.

LACTARIUS MUSHROOM

Lactaires, Lactarius Deliciosus, Çintar, Kanlıca Mantarı

Morel mushrooms belong to the same species as the truffle, but their appearance is quite different. Morel mushrooms range from tan to dark brown, they’re elongated, 2 to 4 inches long and have a cone-shaped cap covered in a honeycomb texture. Wild morels grow from April through June, depending on the region. You may find dried morel mushrooms in specialty stores throughout the year.

Vitamin D

The primary source of vitamin D is sunlight because exposure to ultraviolet light triggers a vitamin D-producing process in your skin. Vitamin D is not found in many foods, especially not in plant-based foods, but it is present in mushrooms. Morels are one of the highest mushroom sources, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. You must have an adequate amount of vitamin D for calcium to be absorbed and used properly. Vitamin D also helps regulate blood pressure and stimulates messenger cells in the immune system. One cup of raw morel mushrooms provides 22 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin D.

Iron

In addition to carrying oxygen, iron stores oxygen and senses when its levels are low. Several enzymes depend on iron to complete their biochemical processes. Iron is needed for some antioxidants, the production of genetic material essential for growth and healing and the creation of energy. Men gain 100 percent of their recommended daily intake for iron from 1 cup of raw morel mushrooms, while women get 44 percent of their daily value.

B Vitamins

The B vitamins function as coenzymes, which means they activate enzymes that trigger biochemical reactions. One of the most important processes that rely on the presence of B vitamins is the conversion of food into energy. Two of the B vitamins -- niacin and vitamin B-6 -- may contribute to heart health. Vitamin B-6 removes a substance from the blood that’s associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. Niacin lowers levels of cholesterol and triglyceride, according to the Linus Pauling Institute. One cup of morel mushrooms provides 8 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin B-6 and niacin and 11 percent of riboflavin.

Antioxidants

Oxidative stress is associated with numerous conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s disease, and diabetes types 1 and 2. Consuming antioxidant-rich food, therefore, is an important strategy to protect against this internal damage. Studies have shown that extracts from morel mycelium are effective in combating oxidation. This is primarily accomplished through the scavenging of damaging molecules known as reactive oxygen species (ROS), including the superoxide, hydroxyl, and nitric oxide radicals (4). Antioxidants from morel mushrooms have also been shown to inhibit lipid peroxidation – a process involving tissue damage which, if left unchecked, can lead to inflammation and cancer (5).

Liver Protection

Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is an inorganic compound which has been linked to disorders of the central nervous system and kidneys. Research on animals has shown that administration of CCl4 with ethanol damages the liver by, among other things, depleting internal antioxidant stores. When supplied with an extract of morel mycelium, however, protection is provided against liver damage, and antioxidant reserves can be restored. This suggests that morel mushroom mycelium may provide therapeutic use as a liver-protecting agent (6).

Low Calorie Content

A 1-cup serving of morel mushrooms, which weighs 68 grams, has just 20 calories. With 0.3 calories per gram, these mushrooms are considered a very low-energy-dense food. That means the mushrooms are very low in calories compared to their weight, so you get to eat a larger portion of them without consuming an excessive number of calories. Including more low-energy-dense foods in your diet can help control hunger when trying to eat fewer calories.

Carbs and Fiber

The morel mushrooms are low in carbs but a good source of fiber. A 1-cup serving contains 3 grams of carbohydrates and 2 grams of fiber. Fiber helps move food through your digestive system. Additionally, getting more fiber in your diet lowers blood cholesterol levels, prevents constipation and helps you feel full faster. Your daily fiber needs vary depending on your age and gender. In general, women need 21 to 25 grams of fiber a day and men 30 to 38 grams.

Some Protein, Negligible Fat

The morel mushrooms also supply a small amount of protein and even a smaller amount of fat. A 1-cup serving contains 2 grams of protein and 0.4 grams of fat. Both protein and fat are essential nutrients you need for good health. Protein repairs tissue and supports immune health, while fat provides energy and helps you absorb fat-soluble vitamins. A healthy diet should get 10 percent to 35 percent of its calories from protein and 20 percent to 35 percent from fat.

Vitamins and Minerals

While morel mushrooms are very low in calories, they are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including iron, potassium and vitamin D. A 1-cup serving of raw morel mushrooms contains 8 milligrams of iron, 271 milligrams of potassium and 136 international units of vitamin D. Iron carries the oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Potassium is necessary for proper functioning of your muscles and nervous system. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and supports bone health.

Morel Crostini

Morel Mushroom Recipes

Ingredients

4 slices baguette
Extra-virgin olive oil
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
1/2 cup fresh morels, cleaned
1 teaspoon minced shallot
2 tablespoons cream sherry
1/4 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup shelled, peeled fava beans
1/8 cup thinly sliced ramp leaves or chives
1 slice cooked bacon, crumbled
Shaved aged Sonoma Jack or Parmesan cheese, for garnish
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
2. Brush both sides of baguette slices with olive oil and place on a baking sheet. Transfer to oven and bake, turning once, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes per side. Remove from oven and set aside.
3. Melt butter in a medium skillet over high heat; cook until butter is lightly browned. Add morels and shallot and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Season with salt and pepper.
4. Add sherry to deglaze and cook until almost evaporated. Add cream and let cook until reduced and thickened slightly. Stir in fava beans and ramp leaves or chives.
5. Divide morel mixture evenly among toasted baguette slices; top with crumbled bacon and garnish with cheese. Serve.